Drone Tech News



UPS Begins Using Drones to Transport Medical Samples at North Carolina Hospitals

UPS Begins Using Drones to Transport Medical Samples at North Carolina Hospitals

UPS said Tuesday it began using unmanned drones to transport medical samples at a North Carolina hospital system, part of its longer-term plan to incorporate drones into its delivery of supplies and samples to medical facilities.The logistics and delivery giant is partnering with Matternet, a drone-logistics startup, to shuttle medical samples among scattered facilities at WakeMed. The 941-bed hospital system includes three full-service hospitals and other facilities in North Carolina’s Triangle area.“Currently, the majority of medical samples and specimens are transported across WakeMed’s expanding health system by courier cars,” UPS said in a statement. “The addition of drone transport provides an option for on-demand and same-day delivery, the ability to avoid roadway delays, increase medical delivery efficiency, lower costs and improve the patient experience with potentially life-saving benefits.”
Bipartisan law pushes use of drones for fighting wildfires

Bipartisan law pushes use of drones for fighting wildfires

President Trump signed a bipartisan bill into law Tuesday that pushes federal agencies to explore increased use of drones in managing and fighting wildfires.Among many other things, the John D. Dingell, Jr. Conservation, Management, and Recreation Act directs the secretary of the Department of the Interior to set up or expand a “research, development, and testing program” to examine the use of unmanned aircraft systems (UAS, or drones) “across the full range of wildland fire management operations.” Now that the bill is law, Interior will have just six months to get the program up and running.
Airports scramble to handle drone incidents

Airports scramble to handle drone incidents

Washington, DC (CNN)Drones have become an increasing nuisance for airports worldwide in recent months, and good solutions to keep them from interfering with flights aren't yet available.Airports in various cities -- including Newark, New Jersey; Gatwick, England; Dublin, Ireland and Dubai -- have grounded planes in the last three months following drone sightings.The incident at Gatwick in December proved especially disruptive, impacting the flights of more than 100,000 passengers. In 2017, a drone hit a commercial airplane approaching Quebec City in Canada. The plane landed safely.
Trump administration releases proposed drone rules and regulatory changes

Trump administration releases proposed drone rules and regulatory changes

More than two years after receiving warnings about a regulatory loophole that could put law enforcement at risk from booby-trapped drones, the Federal Aviation Administration said it will use a truncated public process to fix the problem within two weeks.The move was part of a dizzying array of proposed rules and regulatory changes published last week by the Trump administration, which wants to roll back rules on use of the devices while simultaneously taking steps to ease concerns raised by security officials.In a significant shift, the FAA is also proposing to end its general prohibition on flying drones over people, relying on research and regulations concerning the risks of people getting hit by debris from missile and rocket launches to help make the case.
The US government is about to put a dog tag on your drone

The US government is about to put a dog tag on your drone

Get ready to stick some ID on the outside of your drone — starting February 23rd, a new FAA rule will require all small unmanned aircraft to have their registration markings visible on the outside of their body, so law enforcement can easily find their owners.In a preview document published at the Federal Register (spotted by Bloomberg), the FAA says the move is in response to terrorism fears, specifically “the risk a concealed explosive device poses to first responders who must open a compartment to find the small unmanned aircraft’s registration number.”
Drone Consortium Safir to Increase Efforts to Facilitate European Drone Law Legislation

Drone Consortium Safir to Increase Efforts to Facilitate European Drone Law Legislation

The Safir project, a consortium of 13 public organizations and private companies partly funded by the European Commission, will begin testing drone applications and unmanned traffic management systems in Belgium in hopes to assist the European Union establish a framework for the commercial drone industry, The New York Times reports. Members of Safir (or Safe and Flexible Integration of Initial U-space Services in a Real Environment) met in Brussels in November to discuss the upcoming test trials, which will take place at the DronePort facility in Limburg. “It is about testing 10 drones with different purposes, applications and IT systems,” explained DronePort CEO Mark Vanlook. 
Gatwick drones: 'Military capability' withdrawn from airport

Gatwick drones: 'Military capability' withdrawn from airport

"Military capability" deployed to counter illegal drone flights at Gatwick Airport has been withdrawn, the Ministry of Defence has confirmed.The Army was deployed as hundreds of flights were cancelled on 20 December following repeated drone sightings.Gatwick said it had spent £5m to prevent future attacks, but would not comment on the nature of the system.Sussex Police said no arrests have been made since a couple were released without charge on 23 December.More than 140,000 passengers were affected by cancellations and delays during the 36 hours of chaos.Following a further sighting on 21 December, the airport said the "military measures" had provided "the reassurance necessary that it is safe to reopen"
Here’s the Latest on the Gatwick Drone Disruption: Damaged Drone Being Tested for DNA Evidence

Here’s the Latest on the Gatwick Drone Disruption: Damaged Drone Being Tested for DNA Evidence

Some news outlets still identify the drone operators as “Eco-terrorists.”  Others mention organized crime.  One poice chief suggested that the flying object causing complete chaos at Gatwick Airport last week might not even have been a drone.  The U.K. government and military, airport authorities and law enforcement have all committed major resources to the crime: but so far, we have very few answers about who was responsible for last week’s disruptions.England’s second busiest airport was closed down last Wednesday, December 19, when pilots and airport officials spotted drones “buzzing” over the runways.  In order to avoid a collision, flights were canceled.   The drones were identified by airport officials as “industrial” drones – larger than most recreational or commercial drones, and potentially more damaging to aircraft.   The drones in questions also appear to have a long range – making it more difficult for authorities to identify the operators.
UK police release airport drone suspects and admit there may not have been any drones after all

UK police release airport drone suspects and admit there may not have been any drones after all

Less than a week after mystery drones grounded flights at the U.K.’s second largest airport, wreaking havoc on as many as 140,000 people’s travel plans for the Christmas period, police have admitted that there may in fact not have been any drones at all.Gatwick airport reopened on Friday after a one-day shutdown but it appears that investigators are no closer to knowing what actually took place.The Guardian reports that police released and exonerated a couple who had been detained as suspects, while a senior police spokesperson said there is “always a possibility that there may not have been any genuine drone activity in the first place.”
Delayed thermal camera for Mavic 2 Enterprise at CES 2019 instead

Delayed thermal camera for Mavic 2 Enterprise at CES 2019 instead

We have been informed by one of our trusted sources, that the thermal camera for the Mavic 2 Enterprise, that was to be announced today, will be announced at CES 2019 instead. There is no explanation provided for the delay, but it seems that DJI has thought at the last moment that it might be better to launch the thermal camera for the DJI Mavic 2 Enterprise, at the Consumer (!) Electronics Show in Las Vegas next month, together with the new ‘Pro’ Remote Controller with built-in display for the Mavic 2. There’s also more information on the type of delayed thermal camera btw… Jump right in.
Questions?
Click here to chat with us

_