Drone Tech News


Trump administration releases proposed drone rules and regulatory changes

Trump administration releases proposed drone rules and regulatory changes

More than two years after receiving warnings about a regulatory loophole that could put law enforcement at risk from booby-trapped drones, the Federal Aviation Administration said it will use a truncated public process to fix the problem within two weeks.The move was part of a dizzying array of proposed rules and regulatory changes published last week by the Trump administration, which wants to roll back rules on use of the devices while simultaneously taking steps to ease concerns raised by security officials.In a significant shift, the FAA is also proposing to end its general prohibition on flying drones over people, relying on research and regulations concerning the risks of people getting hit by debris from missile and rocket launches to help make the case.
The US government is about to put a dog tag on your drone

The US government is about to put a dog tag on your drone

Get ready to stick some ID on the outside of your drone — starting February 23rd, a new FAA rule will require all small unmanned aircraft to have their registration markings visible on the outside of their body, so law enforcement can easily find their owners.In a preview document published at the Federal Register (spotted by Bloomberg), the FAA says the move is in response to terrorism fears, specifically “the risk a concealed explosive device poses to first responders who must open a compartment to find the small unmanned aircraft’s registration number.”
Drone Consortium Safir to Increase Efforts to Facilitate European Drone Law Legislation

Drone Consortium Safir to Increase Efforts to Facilitate European Drone Law Legislation

The Safir project, a consortium of 13 public organizations and private companies partly funded by the European Commission, will begin testing drone applications and unmanned traffic management systems in Belgium in hopes to assist the European Union establish a framework for the commercial drone industry, The New York Times reports. Members of Safir (or Safe and Flexible Integration of Initial U-space Services in a Real Environment) met in Brussels in November to discuss the upcoming test trials, which will take place at the DronePort facility in Limburg. “It is about testing 10 drones with different purposes, applications and IT systems,” explained DronePort CEO Mark Vanlook. 
Gatwick drones: 'Military capability' withdrawn from airport

Gatwick drones: 'Military capability' withdrawn from airport

"Military capability" deployed to counter illegal drone flights at Gatwick Airport has been withdrawn, the Ministry of Defence has confirmed.The Army was deployed as hundreds of flights were cancelled on 20 December following repeated drone sightings.Gatwick said it had spent £5m to prevent future attacks, but would not comment on the nature of the system.Sussex Police said no arrests have been made since a couple were released without charge on 23 December.More than 140,000 passengers were affected by cancellations and delays during the 36 hours of chaos.Following a further sighting on 21 December, the airport said the "military measures" had provided "the reassurance necessary that it is safe to reopen"
Here’s the Latest on the Gatwick Drone Disruption: Damaged Drone Being Tested for DNA Evidence

Here’s the Latest on the Gatwick Drone Disruption: Damaged Drone Being Tested for DNA Evidence

Some news outlets still identify the drone operators as “Eco-terrorists.”  Others mention organized crime.  One poice chief suggested that the flying object causing complete chaos at Gatwick Airport last week might not even have been a drone.  The U.K. government and military, airport authorities and law enforcement have all committed major resources to the crime: but so far, we have very few answers about who was responsible for last week’s disruptions.England’s second busiest airport was closed down last Wednesday, December 19, when pilots and airport officials spotted drones “buzzing” over the runways.  In order to avoid a collision, flights were canceled.   The drones were identified by airport officials as “industrial” drones – larger than most recreational or commercial drones, and potentially more damaging to aircraft.   The drones in questions also appear to have a long range – making it more difficult for authorities to identify the operators.
UK police release airport drone suspects and admit there may not have been any drones after all

UK police release airport drone suspects and admit there may not have been any drones after all

Less than a week after mystery drones grounded flights at the U.K.’s second largest airport, wreaking havoc on as many as 140,000 people’s travel plans for the Christmas period, police have admitted that there may in fact not have been any drones at all.Gatwick airport reopened on Friday after a one-day shutdown but it appears that investigators are no closer to knowing what actually took place.The Guardian reports that police released and exonerated a couple who had been detained as suspects, while a senior police spokesperson said there is “always a possibility that there may not have been any genuine drone activity in the first place.”
Delayed thermal camera for Mavic 2 Enterprise at CES 2019 instead

Delayed thermal camera for Mavic 2 Enterprise at CES 2019 instead

We have been informed by one of our trusted sources, that the thermal camera for the Mavic 2 Enterprise, that was to be announced today, will be announced at CES 2019 instead. There is no explanation provided for the delay, but it seems that DJI has thought at the last moment that it might be better to launch the thermal camera for the DJI Mavic 2 Enterprise, at the Consumer (!) Electronics Show in Las Vegas next month, together with the new ‘Pro’ Remote Controller with built-in display for the Mavic 2. There’s also more information on the type of delayed thermal camera btw… Jump right in.
Drone may have hit Boeing 737 just before jet landed in Mexico

Drone may have hit Boeing 737 just before jet landed in Mexico

Mexican airline Aeromexico is investigating whether a drone slammed into one of its Boeing 737 jetliners as the aircraft approached its destination Wednesday in Tijuana, Mexico, on the U.S. border.Images on local media showed considerable damage to the nose of the 737-800, which was operating as Flight 773 from Guadalajara. In a cabin recording, crew members can be heard saying they heard a "pretty loud bang" and asking the control tower to check if the nose was damaged. The collision happened shortly before landing."The exact cause is still being investigated," Grupo Aeromexico said in a statement. "The aircraft landed normally and the passengers' safety was never compromised."
Heavy-hauling drone lays claim to a Guinness World Record

Heavy-hauling drone lays claim to a Guinness World Record

We first caught wind of the Skyf drone around a year ago, and the Russian outfit rolled out some pretty outrageous performance specs to go with it. With a mix of gasoline and electric motors, the massive multirotor drone can apparently carry a 440-lb (220 kg) payload for up to eight hours. Recent demonstration flights in Tatarstan, Russia, didn't see it quite reach these lofty heights, but it did do enough for its creators to lay claim to a Guinness World Record.
Drone deal approved

Drone deal approved

Parliament has finally approved the drones-for-medical delivery deal after three failed attempts. The Ghana Health Service (GHS) introduced the deal to help deliver blood and essential medicines across the country, especially to rural communities. 102 MPs voted for the deal while 58 dissented. The GHS recently described the deal as extremely useful and called on all Ghanaians to support the idea. Addressing a press conference on Tuesday, 4th December 2018, the Director-General of the GHS, Dr. Anthony Nsiah Asare expressed worry over the continuous politicisation of government's novel ideas by the opposition National Democratic Congress (NDC), even when they have little understanding of the matter.


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