Cannabis Technology



Legalizing marijuana? Americans support it, but not enough to sway their vote in 2020

Legalizing marijuana? Americans support it, but not enough to sway their vote in 2020

A majority of Americans support legalizing cannabis, but a recent CBS News poll found the issue may not have have much sway from voters. According to the poll, 65 percent of Americans think marijuana should be legal, but 56 percent said the issue wouldn't sway their vote for a candidate across party lines. The poll was released just ahead of April 20, or "420 Day," one of the most recognized dates in cannabis culture. Attention to cannabis reform has steadily climbed in the country this year as decriminalization has become a stance supported by many of the 2020 democratic presidential hopefuls. In February, New Jersey Sen. Cory Booker, a 2020 Democratic hopeful, reintroduced the Marijuana Justice Act, a bill that would legalize marijuana and has a criminal justice component that would expunge federal convictions for possession or use of the drug.
Lawmakers Want Legal Protections For Universities That Research Marijuana

Lawmakers Want Legal Protections For Universities That Research Marijuana

A bipartisan group of lawmakers on Capitol Hill is asking House leadership to protect universities that conduct research on marijuana from being penalized under federal law. In a letter sent to the chairwoman and ranking member of a House education appropriations subcommittee, Rep. Joe Neguse (D) and 25 colleagues wrote that “there are a multitude of higher education institutions conducting a range of cannabis-related research, including many in our districts, who prefer for future developments to occur through an accredited educational setting.”
Congressional Bill Would Automatically Seal Marijuana Conviction Records

Congressional Bill Would Automatically Seal Marijuana Conviction Records

Bipartisan legislation filed in the House of Representatives on Tuesday would automatically seal federal criminal records for marijuana convictions. The legislation, titled the Clean Slate Act, would also create a new procedure allowing people to petition federal courts to seal records for other nonviolent offenses that aren’t automatically sealed under the bill, such as convictions involving other drugs. “At the time of sentencing of a covered individual for a conviction pursuant to section 404 of the Controlled Substances Act (21 16 U.S.C. 844) or of any Federal nonviolent offense involving marijuana,” the bill text states, “the court shall enter an order that each record and portion thereof that relates to the offense shall be sealed automatically on the date that is one year after the covered individual fulfills each requirement of the sentence, except that such record shall not be sealed if the individual has been convicted of a subsequent criminal offense
Congressional Committees Outline Plans For Marijuana Reform In 2019

Congressional Committees Outline Plans For Marijuana Reform In 2019

If it wasn’t apparent already, passing marijuana reform legislation will be a priority for House Democrats in the 116th Congress. The latest sign is a series of committee reports outlining cannabis-related issues various panels plan to tackle. The reports, compiled by the House Oversight and Reform Committee, are meant to “form a coherent blueprint for Congress to address issues of concern to working families across the country.” To that end, panels dedicated to financial services, health and justice reported on their plans to advance various legislation concerning marijuana.
Colorado’s new U.S. attorney agrees with rescinding of Cole Memo, says “jury is still out” on enforcement around marijuana concentrates

Colorado’s new U.S. attorney agrees with rescinding of Cole Memo, says “jury is still out” on enforcement around marijuana concentrates

Jason Dunn, a President Donald Trump appointee, said his views of cannabis are much like those of his predecessors -- which would mean little impact on the state’s legal marijuana industry Jason Dunn, Colorado’s new U.S. attorney, says he agrees with the Trump administration’s decision last year to rescind an Obama-era directive that largely took a hands-off approach to enforcement in states that legalized marijuana. The President Donald Trump appointee also said he’s also concerned about highly potent cannabis concentrates. “The jury is still out on what kind of enforcement priority that creates.”
Congressional Democrats Hold First-Ever Marijuana Reform Panel At Policy Retreat

Congressional Democrats Hold First-Ever Marijuana Reform Panel At Policy Retreat

For the first time, congressional Democrats held a policy retreat that featured a panel dedicated entirely to marijuana reform and the need to repair the harms of the war on drugs. The panel at House Democrats’ gathering took place last Thursday morning, with reform advocates sharing their perspective on cannabis legislation moving through Congress and discussing not just why legalization is important but emphasizing how a legal cannabis system should be implemented. That marijuana should be legalized seemed to be accepted as a foregone conclusion at the event, which attracted no opponents and contained no discussion of whether to end prohibition. Instead, conversations centered on how to shape the legal industry.
Where the war on weed still rages

Where the war on weed still rages

Marijuana possession led to nearly 6 percent of all arrests in the United States in 2017, FBI data shows, underscoring the level of policing dedicated to containing behavior that’s legal in 10 states and the nation’s capital. But the figure obscures the considerable variations in enforcement practices at the state and local levels. In many areas of the country in 2016, more than 20 percent of all arrests stemmed from pot possession, according to newly released county-level arrest figures from the National Archive of Criminal Justice Data. The figure exceeds 40 percent in a handful of counties, topping out at nearly 55 percent in one Georgia county.
New Trump attorney general endorses Gardner’s marijuana legalization bill

New Trump attorney general endorses Gardner’s marijuana legalization bill

U.S. Attorney General William Barr said Wednesday that he prefers Sen. Cory Gardner’s legislation on marijuana to the “intolerable” patchwork of state and federal laws that exists today. “Personally, I would still favor one uniform federal rule against marijuana, but if there is not sufficient consensus to obtain that, then I think the way to go is to permit a more federal approach, that states can make their own decisions within the framework of the federal law and so we’re not just ignoring the enforcement of federal law,” said Barr, who took over in February. Barr was asked by Sen. Lisa Murkowski, an Alaska Republican, about the STATES Act. The Gardner legislation is backed by a bipartisan group in Congress and would prevent authorities from enforcing a federal marijuana prohibition in states that have legalized, such as Colorado.
Alex Berenson and the Last Anti-Cannabis Crusade

Alex Berenson and the Last Anti-Cannabis Crusade

In 1937, America’s first drug czar, Harry J. Anslinger, published a feature story in The American Magazine titled “Marijuana, Assassin of Youth.” The article featured a vicious ax murderer with a drug problem. “An entire family was murdered by a youthful addict in Florida,” Anslinger wrote. “When officers arrived at the home, they found the youth staggering about in a human slaughterhouse. With an ax he had killed his father, his mother, two brothers, and a sister. He seemed to be in a daze.” At the time, Anslinger was the commissioner of the Federal Bureau of Narcotics, the institution that preceded the Drug Enforcement Administration. The same year, he drafted legislation that effectively made cannabis illegal at the federal level.
Recreational marijuana bill signed into law

Recreational marijuana bill signed into law

Guam Governor Lou Leon Guerrero today signed the Cannabis Industry Act of 2019 into law.Sen. Clynt Ridgell’s Bill No. 32-35 establishes a framework for the creation of a cannabis industry that could eventually lead to the legalization of the production, sale and taxation of marijuana on Guam.The governor’s approval comes 8 days after it was passed by the legislature on a vote of  8-7.Sens. Ridgell, Joe San Agustin, Régine Biscoe Lee, Telo Taitague, Louise Muna, Jose Terlaje, Kelly Marsh and Speaker Tina Muña Barnes voted in favor of the measure.
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