Cannabis Technology



The Cannabis Industry Has Lots of Jobs, But Few Are High-Paying

The Cannabis Industry Has Lots of Jobs, But Few Are High-Paying

Presidential candidates can be tough on climate change — by some metrics, they must be — but anyone wanting to be president must also say a few nice things about coal. This is because in Ohio and Pennsylvania, two states any would-be president almost certainly must win, coal is equated with decent work. Such appeals are mostly a nostalgic technique, as only 53,000 Americans work in the coal industry today. This is a fraction of the jobs created by the cannabis industry, for which 2018 was a year of record growth. As The New York Times reported over the weekend, as many as 300,000 Americans now work in the cannabis industry. If current trends continue, that figure could eclipse the million-worker mark by decade’s end.
D.C. Mayor Muriel Bowser unveils bill to legalize recreational marijuana sales

D.C. Mayor Muriel Bowser unveils bill to legalize recreational marijuana sales

D.C. Mayor Muriel E. Bowser (D) announced legislation Thursday to legalize and regulate recreational marijuana dispensaries in the nation’s capital, setting up a potential showdown with the federal government. The District’s marijuana laws are in limbo. Residents may grow and possess small amounts of the drug under a 2014 voter-approved law. But they cannot legally purchase pot, and the city cannot tax sales because of a provision in the federal budget that prohibits the District from enacting or enforcing marijuana legalization laws.
Texas Lawmakers Approve Marijuana Decriminalization Bill

Texas Lawmakers Approve Marijuana Decriminalization Bill

Texas would become the 25th state in the U.S. to remove the threat of being jailed as a punishment for possessing small amounts of marijuana under a bill approved by the state House of Representatives on Monday. The legislation, which would punish people caught with an ounce or less of cannabis with a $500 fine instead of arrest and incarceration, passed by a vote of 98 to 43. Rep. Joseph Moody (D), the chief sponsor, amended the bill on the floor in order to win more support from colleagues. An earlier version included a lower fine—$250—and would have treated low-level possession as a civil infraction instead of a class C misdemeanor as is the case under the revised proposal.
Congress Will Hold A Hearing On Three Marijuana Bills Next Week

Congress Will Hold A Hearing On Three Marijuana Bills Next Week

In the latest sign that congressional Democrats are using their new majority to prioritize marijuana law reform issues that languished under prior Republican leadership, a House subcommittee has scheduled a hearing on Tuesday to discuss three cannabis bills focusing on military veterans. The legislation up for consideration concerns veterans’ access to medical marijuana, expanding research on cannabis’s therapeutic value and protecting U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) benefits for those using the drug in compliance with state law. It will be the second marijuana-related hearing of the 116th Congress, following a separate House committee’s appro
Legalizing marijuana? Americans support it, but not enough to sway their vote in 2020

Legalizing marijuana? Americans support it, but not enough to sway their vote in 2020

A majority of Americans support legalizing cannabis, but a recent CBS News poll found the issue may not have have much sway from voters. According to the poll, 65 percent of Americans think marijuana should be legal, but 56 percent said the issue wouldn't sway their vote for a candidate across party lines. The poll was released just ahead of April 20, or "420 Day," one of the most recognized dates in cannabis culture. Attention to cannabis reform has steadily climbed in the country this year as decriminalization has become a stance supported by many of the 2020 democratic presidential hopefuls. In February, New Jersey Sen. Cory Booker, a 2020 Democratic hopeful, reintroduced the Marijuana Justice Act, a bill that would legalize marijuana and has a criminal justice component that would expunge federal convictions for possession or use of the drug.
Lawmakers Want Legal Protections For Universities That Research Marijuana

Lawmakers Want Legal Protections For Universities That Research Marijuana

A bipartisan group of lawmakers on Capitol Hill is asking House leadership to protect universities that conduct research on marijuana from being penalized under federal law. In a letter sent to the chairwoman and ranking member of a House education appropriations subcommittee, Rep. Joe Neguse (D) and 25 colleagues wrote that “there are a multitude of higher education institutions conducting a range of cannabis-related research, including many in our districts, who prefer for future developments to occur through an accredited educational setting.”
Congressional Bill Would Automatically Seal Marijuana Conviction Records

Congressional Bill Would Automatically Seal Marijuana Conviction Records

Bipartisan legislation filed in the House of Representatives on Tuesday would automatically seal federal criminal records for marijuana convictions. The legislation, titled the Clean Slate Act, would also create a new procedure allowing people to petition federal courts to seal records for other nonviolent offenses that aren’t automatically sealed under the bill, such as convictions involving other drugs. “At the time of sentencing of a covered individual for a conviction pursuant to section 404 of the Controlled Substances Act (21 16 U.S.C. 844) or of any Federal nonviolent offense involving marijuana,” the bill text states, “the court shall enter an order that each record and portion thereof that relates to the offense shall be sealed automatically on the date that is one year after the covered individual fulfills each requirement of the sentence, except that such record shall not be sealed if the individual has been convicted of a subsequent criminal offense
Congressional Committees Outline Plans For Marijuana Reform In 2019

Congressional Committees Outline Plans For Marijuana Reform In 2019

If it wasn’t apparent already, passing marijuana reform legislation will be a priority for House Democrats in the 116th Congress. The latest sign is a series of committee reports outlining cannabis-related issues various panels plan to tackle. The reports, compiled by the House Oversight and Reform Committee, are meant to “form a coherent blueprint for Congress to address issues of concern to working families across the country.” To that end, panels dedicated to financial services, health and justice reported on their plans to advance various legislation concerning marijuana.
Colorado’s new U.S. attorney agrees with rescinding of Cole Memo, says “jury is still out” on enforcement around marijuana concentrates

Colorado’s new U.S. attorney agrees with rescinding of Cole Memo, says “jury is still out” on enforcement around marijuana concentrates

Jason Dunn, a President Donald Trump appointee, said his views of cannabis are much like those of his predecessors -- which would mean little impact on the state’s legal marijuana industry Jason Dunn, Colorado’s new U.S. attorney, says he agrees with the Trump administration’s decision last year to rescind an Obama-era directive that largely took a hands-off approach to enforcement in states that legalized marijuana. The President Donald Trump appointee also said he’s also concerned about highly potent cannabis concentrates. “The jury is still out on what kind of enforcement priority that creates.”
Congressional Democrats Hold First-Ever Marijuana Reform Panel At Policy Retreat

Congressional Democrats Hold First-Ever Marijuana Reform Panel At Policy Retreat

For the first time, congressional Democrats held a policy retreat that featured a panel dedicated entirely to marijuana reform and the need to repair the harms of the war on drugs. The panel at House Democrats’ gathering took place last Thursday morning, with reform advocates sharing their perspective on cannabis legislation moving through Congress and discussing not just why legalization is important but emphasizing how a legal cannabis system should be implemented. That marijuana should be legalized seemed to be accepted as a foregone conclusion at the event, which attracted no opponents and contained no discussion of whether to end prohibition. Instead, conversations centered on how to shape the legal industry.
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